Thursday, December 17, 2015

Of limits and sliding scales

I've recently been watching and enjoying Quantico, with the exploits of Alex Parrish (or Anisha Punjabi, as I like to call her) on her quest to initially work through the trials of the FBI training course  held at Quantico and then the apparent framing for the bombing at Grand Central station.

I was originally reticent to start Quantico as it was chock-full of beautiful 20/30-somethings, and so, I naturally thought it would be a relatively vapid and dallianced-centric story. And, yes, I was right but it also had a bit of fun with training exercises and a good dose of back story and conspiracies that ticked a few boxes.

Personally, I think it would be wonderful if Ms Parrish turns out to be the master mind behind this whole thing. It would tickle my brain to see the main protagonist as the big bad ... and yet this possible avenue has not yet closed even as it nears the finale. Anyway, the person who plays her is a former Miss World and so we get lots of glamour shots of her attempting to remain inconspicuous while doing her 'blue steel.' Needless to say, it's quite ridiculous.



Speaking of ridiculous, I'll give you the following examples:
  • One Quantico application is faking being gay, needing glasses and has hidden the time he served in Syria from the FBI
  • One Quantico applicant had sex with an under-age girl who then died during an illegal abortion
  • One Quantico applicant continually wires large sums of money to midde-eastern contacts through FBI networks
  • Middle-eastern twins are masquerading as a single Quantico applicant
  • One Quantico applicant maintains a fake scar behind her ear for the most inane possible reason
  • Pretty much every person in the alumni has a questionable back-story which wasn't divulged to the FBI
And, somehow, the FBI were incapable of doing even the most basic of background checks on their recruits. Colour me skeptical or very, very afraid if that's the level of ineptitude to be expected from the FBI.

In addition, (I would guess) the 5-year-old writing team for Quantico decided to write a 'clever twist' to the story by getting Ms Parrish to publicly declare herself as guilty ('To make the real master mind behind the bombing relax') and then immediately, upon her public incarceration, get transported back to FBI HQ, get unshackled and then state to every possible terrorist candidate that 'it's just a ruse (nya nya nya).'  Hmmm ... I don't think they thought that through. If you know that one of the fresh Quantico graduates were responsible, why would you 
  1. Get them to investigate themselves
  2. Get the publicly-declared martyr to be secretly involved in the investigation
  3. Have anyone, who could possibly be involved in the terrorist plans, perform the formal investigation
At this point I've given up trying to glean any logic from the procedings. I will probably still watch until its season finale, but it's well-and-truly moved into Transformers territory on the gray-matter scale. My recommendation is to put your brain in neutral and watch the pretty people and 'splosions and you'll do just fine.